Plain or General X-Ray

Introduction

This is the most commonly performed investigation for assessing injured limbs or examining the chest for possible infection. An x-ray image, or radiograph, is produced when a very small amount of radiation passes through the body and strikes a sheet of sensitive film or a detector placed on the other side of the body. The ability of x-rays to penetrate tissues and bones varies according to the composition and mass of what is being imaged. Bone, which contains calcium, absorbs most of the radiation and results in white images on the x-ray film. The lungs, which are filled with air, allow nearly all x-rays to pass through and strike the film or detector resulting in a black image. You will not feel any discomfort during the procedure.

Related images

Preparation

There is no special preparation required for most x-rays. Upon arrival you may be asked by the radiographer to change into a gown before your examination. You may also be asked to remove jewellery, eyeglasses, and any metal objects that may obscure the images.

You will be exposed to a very small amount of radiation when you receive an x-ray. At Perth Radiological Clinic, we use advanced digital x-ray equipment to ensure you are exposed to the minimum amount of radiation needed to obtain adequate images.

If you are pregnant or suspect that you may be, you should tell your doctor or radiographer before the test is performed, as special precautions may have to be taken.

Please bring any previous x-rays with you on the day of your examination.

Information brochure

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